ROMANZO CRIMINALE
 

Directed by Michele Placido. Italy. 2005.


Talking Pictures alias talkingpix.co.uk
 
 


 
 

Home

Reviews

Features

Book 
Reviews

News

About Us

Email

 

This Italian film has won some rave reviews and appeared at the London Film Festival in 2006.  It has been described as an Italian Goodfellas and while it may be of that bloodline it owes as much to De Palma’s Scarface, in its glorification of violence and drug-taking.  Directed by renowned Michele Placido and featuring some young starlets who impress in all their various roles especially Kim Rossi Stuart who is Ice, the virtual mute at the start who ends ups standing tallest and Pierfrancesco Favino as Lebanese the loudest and most memorable member of the gang with his imposing eyes and beard.  You would think women would not get a nice deal but not so here as Anna Mouglalis and Jasmine Trinca play the whore and innocent both well. 
 

Set in Rome over three decades up to the fall of the Berlin Wall, the film expertly deals with all the storyline as Det. Scialoja (Stefano Accorsi) attempts to trek down the gang and prove their guilt.  It is the bravado and pacing of the film, so in common with Goodfellas and Casino but this cinema as entertainment with a big moment appearing every few minutes to make sure you are still watching and will not lose interest.  By the end and the apparent bloodbath, there is a great sense of closure as the last member is dead on a church’s steps he is draped with a white cloth, indicating as discussed with his girlfriend earlier - the white cloth symbolises the innocent youth will not live long.  A great sense of statement and purpose coupled with the need of closure and finality.  The film is a credit to the editor and cinematography, a colletctive unit working in perfect harmony creating a great cinematic adventure that does not glorify gangsters but at times certainly does make it attractive.  Recommended.

Jamie Garwood
 
 
Search this site or the web        powered by FreeFind
Site searchWeb search

 
   Home | News | Features
    Book Reviews | About Us